Ode to a sound

What am I talking about when I speak of jazz?
We talking space that speaks
We talking place with speed
And reeds that breathe, whisper and bleed
We speak of slow pain
Blues way down tempo
Like a Bird considered dead
But suddenly
Phoenixes with a sudden gusty uptake
Flurry of notes and paraphrased anecdotes
Accents from a passionate world
We talking broken language
Accents of a thriving Diaspora
The familiar and the strange
Anti-clockwise versions of orange
Kaleidoscope of colours clashing
Harmonising then disolving into beautyfully mathematically inacurrate nothingness in syncopated sequences
Bleak existentialism
Black Existential dread
Ukuthula nenxushunxushu
Amaqoqo nezimvuthu
Uxolo nesiphithiphithi
Usuku lodlame nobusuku benzolo
Ikuthangi neyizolo
Ubuthakathaka nokululama
The first thing to know about jazz is that there is No such thing as jazz
Yet not everything they call jazz is jazz
Paradox mired in quicksand
Hear it in Trane’s Equinox
A soaring upward spiral of a novice long-winded astronaught seeking new planets from a crevice in space and self created time
Hear it in Abdullah Ibrahim’s Mountain of the Night
Slow burning Blue flames and runaway veldfires raging around a cool stream running untouched
The black flakes of burned grass fallin on it like petals of crystalline snow
Jazz is an uncle rantimg uncanny wisdom in a drunken trance
She is also a sober minded Belle whispering I love you to a cruel lover with the most seering sincerity
She is used to all kinds of indigo moods
Yet with Sarah Vaughan’s elegance
She refuses to be diluted or be reduced to mindless loves
Fuckboys and their blase’ blase’
Cannot take Her hope
She aint no cheap thrill
She has had her fill
Of needles bottles and smokey bars
From the 20s to the 60s
They have invited her in only to chew her out
Took her to the bioscope
Trying to make a lady out of an enigmatic tramp
But she escaped all labels and remains enthroned in her own private state of Yin and Yang
Coloured and never gray
Unless She is fixing to rain
Bold and never weak
Unless she needs to display Her vulnerability
Elegant muse
Black classical Blues
Everything won yet nothing to lose
This Being called Jazz is a Shaman’s dream boogie
A thing of no nation
An activist with convictions beyond politics
Multiversal and viscerally private
Provocative and transluscent
Yet still Black as the root in a Healers bitter brew …
She is also a just music

“On Adapting the Fight to One’s Realities” by Amilcar Cabral

African Heritage

Amilcar Cabral on a stamp with the flag of Guinea Bissau Amilcar Cabral on a stamp with the flag of Guinea Bissau

It so happens that in our country the Portuguese colonialists did not expropriate the land; they allowed us to cultivate the land. They did not create agricultural companies of the European type as they did, for instance, in Angola, displacing masses of Africans in order to settle Europeans. We maintained a basic structure under colonialism – the land as co-operative property of the village, of the community. This is a very important characteristic of our peasantry, which was not directly exploited by the colonisers but was exploited through trade, through the differences between the prices and the real value of products. This is where the exploitation occurs, not in work, as happens in Angola with the hired workers and company employees. This created a special difficulty in our struggle – that of showing the peasant that he was being…

View original post 243 more words

Sacred Profane

What am I talking about when I speak of jazz?
We talking space that speaks
We talking place with speed
And reeds that breathe, whisper and bleed
We speak of slow pain
Blues way down tempo
Like a Bird considered dead
But suddenly
Phoenixes with a sudden gusty uptake
Flurry of notes and paraphrased anecdotes
Accents from a passionate world
We talking broken language
Accents of a thriving Diaspora
The familiar and the strange
Anti-clockwise versions of orange
Kaleidoscope of colours clashing
Harmonising then disolving into beautyfully mathematically inacurrate nothingness in syncopated sequences
Bleak existentialism
Black Existential dread
Ukuthula nenxushunxushu
Amaqoqo nezimvuthu
Uxolo nesiphithiphithi
Usuku lodlame nobusuku benzolo
Ikuthangi neyizolo
Ubuthakathaka nokululama
The first thing to know about jazz is that there is No such thing as jazz
Yet not everything they call jazz is jazz
Paradox mired in quicksand
Hear it in Trane’s Equinox
A soaring upward spiral of a novice long-winded astronaught seeking new planets from a crevice in space and self created time
Hear it in Abdullah Ibrahim’s Mountain of the Night
Slow burning Blue flames and runaway veldfires raging around a cool stream running untouched
The black flakes of burned grass fallin on it like petals of crystalline snow
Jazz is an uncle rantimg uncanny wisdom in a drunken trance
She is also a sober minded Belle whispering I love you to a cruel lover with the most seering sincerity
She is used to all kinds of indigo moods
Yet with Sarah Vaughan’s elegance
She refuses to be diluted or be reduced to mindless loves
Fuckboys and their blase’ blase’
Cannot take Her hope
She aint no cheap thrill
She has had her fill
Of needles bottles and smokey bars
From the 20s to the 60s
They have invited her in only to chew her out
Took her to the bioscope
Trying to make a lady out of an enigmatic tramp
But she escaped all labels and remains enthroned in her own private state of Yin and Yang
Coloured and never gray
Unless She is fixing to rain
Bold and never weak
Unless she needs to display Her vulnerability
Elegant muse
Black classical Blues
Everything won yet nothing to lose
This Being called Jazz is a Shaman’s dream boogie
A thing of no nation
An activist with convictions beyond politics
Multiversal and viscerally private
Provocative and transluscent
Yet still Black as the root in a Healers bitter brew …
She is also a just music

Waaqeffannaa (Amantii Oromoo):The traditional faith system of the Oromo people

OromianEconomist

O

Waaqeffannaa (Amantii Oromoo), the traditional faith system of the Oromo people, is one version of the monotheistic African Traditional Religion (ATR), where the followers of this faith system do believe in only one Supreme Being. African traditional religion is a term referring to a variety of religious practices of the only ONE African religion, which Oromo believers call Waaqeffannaa (believe in Waaqa, the supreme Being), an indigenous faith system to the continent of Africa. Even though there are different ways of practicing this religion with varieties of rituals, in truth, the different versions of the African religion have got the following commonalities:

– Believe in and celebrate a Supreme Being, or a Creator, which is referred to by a myriad of names in various languages as Waaqeffataa Oromo do often say: Waaqa maqaa dhibbaa = God with hundreds of names and Waaqa Afaan dhibbaa = God with hundreds of languages…

View original post 5,785 more words

Marlon James on Dylan and Marley, and Beginnings and Endings

Jane Lucas

Marlon James / macalester.edu Marlon James / macalester.edu

Only a few hours after the announcement of this year’s Nobel Prize for literature, novelist Marlon James, recipient of the 2015 Man Booker prize, took the stage at Lenoir-Rhyne’s Belk Centrum and said that he was “very excited” about Bob Dylan’s win. James questioned whether the people who opposed the choice of Dylan had heard much of his music. Many ancient epics were written to be sung, James observed, and he challenged the audience to “listen to ‘It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)’” and “tell me it’s not literature.”

Turning from Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize to his own writing, James—one of the featured authors in Lenoir-Rhyne’s Visiting Writers Series—said that the first sentence that he wrote of his third novel, A Brief History of Seven Killings (2014), was now on page 458 and joked that the 680-plus page novel was actually an 800-page book, but…

View original post 752 more words

Wadada At Work ( part 1)

All About Jazz review of the 2010 reissue: “Certainly, composition in jazz has gone well beyond head arrangements that bracket solos and group playing—sometimes approaching areas that sound so open as to seem free-form. Multi-instrumentalist, trumpeter and composer Ishmael Wadada Leo Smith is one of a number of figures in this music whose work has long sought to explore and expand the blurred lines between composition and improvisation; one of the structural/notational strategies he has used (formulated in works of the 1970s and 1980s) is called Akhreanvention.

In 1978, Smith wrote that this concept is predicated on “creating and inventing musical ideas simultaneously, utilizing the fundamental laws of improvisation and composition. Within this system, all of the elements of the scored music are controlled through symbols designating duration, improvisation, and moving sounds of different velocities. These symbols are depicted on two types of staffs; sound staffs divided into low, medium and high, and sound staffs of adjustable sound partials.”

In their audible essence, the motion between areas of notated and improvised components operate on a similar axis, held in a fairly constant range of orbit with one another. Smith recorded Spirit Catcher in 1979 while he was living in New Haven, Connecticut and co-directing the Creative Musicians Improvisers Forum. His group, New Dalta Akhri, featured a coterie of musicians located in Connecticut and New York, such as drummer Pheeroan AkLaff, vibraphonist Bobby Naughton, bassist/flutist Wes Brown and reedman Dwight Andrews. In addition to Nessa, Smith and New Dalta Akhri recorded for ECM and his own Kabell Records.

This reissue, the session’s first time on CD, adds an additional take of a piece for three harps and trumpet, “The Burning Of Stones.” What’s striking about the lengthy opening piece, “Images,” is how utterly rigorous its execution is. A microcosm of how the quintet operates appears in the first few minutes, where vibrato-laden clarinet, vibes, arco bass and martial percussion measure themselves in small delicate progressions quickly joined by a clarion trumpet call. A linkage of short unison horn phrases quickly become slightly opposing, and lead into a few seconds of trumpet/bass duet; when Andrews’ clarinet trills enter, the trio is embroiled in darting collectivity.

Those darts return to a stately sense of pause and are rejoined by lumps of vibes and drum set, brass and wood following atonal lines into loosely intertwined phrases. The title could refer to either side of the improvisation/composition coin—short written sections that demarcate areas of related-but-open play, or the free vignettes that spiral out from collective notation.

The title track is a moderately heavier proposition, and a rare example of Andrews’ throaty tenor at play in the particulates of Smith’s writing. The piece opens with a string of small rhythm unit bursts underpinned by bass and Naughton’s “Air Raid” chords; splashes of cymbal and snare patter support Andrews’ lilting peals and the vibraphonist’s harping refractions. “Spirit Catcher” might be the nearest approach to crackling “free jazz” that New Dalta Akhri got, but the specific rhythmic order followed throughout lends the improvisations a unique quality.

“The Burning Of Stones” use of a harp trio is really unlike anything else in contemporary creative music. At once mimicking the Japanese koto and exploring upper partials in quavering dissonance, the trio is set in active relief to Smith’s Miles Davis-ian mute, like Gil Evans arranging a Toru Takemitsu composition. Like the other pieces here, the trumpet part is made up of a series of improvisational flourishes linked by notated elements (of course, all are of a single piece), each note and tone row a clearly demarked unit that gives rise to inflections and immediacy. Recorded crisply by Rudy Van Gelder (unlike the somewhat murky Kabell LPs), Spirit Catcher presents Smith’s earlier music with clarity and warmth, and it’s welcome news to have this set in print once again.”